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CHINSE 1200 - Elementary Chinese II

Huichun Liang, Sec.I: Mon., Tue., Wed., Thur., Fri.11-11:50 am, and Thur.:2-2:50 pm (Lab);
Section II: Mon., Tue., Wed., Thur., Fri: 3-3:40 pm, and Thur: 4-4:50 pm(Lab). 

(6 credits)

This is the second semester of elementary Chinese, and is designed for students who finished elementary Chinese I, or the equivalent.  Emphasis will be placed on all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing).  After successful    completion of this course, students will be able to communicate in Mandarin Chinese regarding everyday topics with a vocabulary of about 800 words. Students will also show a solid foundation in the character writing skills, linguistic structures, listening skills, and pronunciation necessary for further study of the language.  

CHINSE 2310 - Chinese Civilization

Michael Volz, T/Th 2-3:15

The goal of this course is for students to gain a basic understanding of the people, culture, and nation of present-day China.  Since the present cannot be understood without knowledge of the past, we will approach this goal by building knowledge of China's history, traditional religions, philosophy, arts, literature, food, customs, and language with a focus on how these traditional aspects of Chinese culture are manifested in and influence modern day China.   The course is divided into 3 broad themes:  Traditional China, Modern China, and Life and Arts in China.  Since this is a survey course, it is also hoped that students will come away with a desire to explore the subject more deeply. 

CHINSE 3160 - Intermediate Chinese 2

Michael Volz, M/W/F 1:00 - 1:50pm

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Chinese 1 (3rd semester Chinese) and builds on the basic vocabulary and language skills learned in that class.  In this course students will be introduced to more complex grammatical constructions, and will extend their ability to use those constructions for both written and oral communication. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to communicate in Mandarin Chinese regarding everyday topics with a vocabulary of just over 1600 words. 

CHINSE 3190 - Advanced Chinese II

Huichun Liang, Mon., Wed., Fri. 12-12:50 pm. (3 credits)

This course is the second semester of advanced Chinese, and is designed for those who finished Advanced Chinese I or the equivalent.  This course aims to develop student’s ability in advanced Chinese with an emphasis on the improvement of the four language skills. Different meaningful contexts will be created and provided. Students will be encouraged to be actively involved and be engaged in different kinds of communicative tasks that require the use of the vocabulary words, grammatical patterns, discourse device, and cultural information learned in this class. Through learning and discussing the topics, such as music, crime, and cultural discussion, students learn to express themselves in descriptively, persuasively, critically, and philosophically. After successful completion of the course, students should be able to have a vocabulary of 2100 words, demonstrate Chinese grammar appropriate for advance level, and use more cohesive devices to link sentences, form paragraphs, and have broader knowledge about Chinese culture and modern Chinese society.

CHINSE 3310 - Chinese Poetry into English-An introduction

Huichun Liang, Mon. Wed., Fri. 2 to 2:50 pm. (3 credits)

This is an introductory course to Chinese poetry, both classical and contemporary, in English. The course serves to heighten students’ appreciation for language itself in its most intense forms. It will explore issues in the intercultural and inter-lingual interpretation of foreign literature through the study of Western translations of and scholarship on selected Chinese poets. This course will enable students to take a look at several different academic disciplines and the way they create and analyze knowledge about the world. It is a course to ensure that students examine experiences, perspectives, and values different from those that are dominant in the United States and Europe. By its very nature, the course introduces students to one major aspect of Chinese culture and obliges students to think about cross-cultural communication.

CHINSE 3880 - Chinese Film and Society

Michael Volz, T/Th 12:30 - 1:45, W 6:00 - 8:30

This course provides an introduction to the development of 20th century Chinese film and an exploration of contemporary China through film. Students will be introduced to samples of film genres currently popular in China as well as popular films of earlier times, which are still ingrained in the national consciousness.  Through these films and accompanying readings, we will explore how present-day Chinese understand their own history, and the issues that they face in their drive towards modernization in a global context.

FRENCH 1100 - Elementary French I

Cliton Seide, Florian Humbert, Raoul Bozo. MoTuWeTh

FRENCH 1100 is a beginner French course devoted to the acquisition of basic communicative structures and vocabulary for daily life.  It will be conducted in French with emphasis on practical and meaningful communication.  French 1100 will also introduce the student to the culture of France and Francophone regions of the world.

 The aim of the course is to develop the ability to communicate in French through listening, reading, writing and speaking with a particular emphasis on oral communication. Class time will be primarily devoted to oral activities (conversations, surveys, partner-work, group discussions, etc.) while the time outside of class will be spent preparing for classes, reviewing materials, grammar and vocabulary exercises, and practicing your written French skills.

FRENCH 1200 - Elementary French II

Mary Dickson, Raoul Bozo. MoTuWeTh

FRENCH 1200 is the continuation of French 1100 and is designed for those who have taken French 1100 or who have studied some French elsewhere. You must have earned at least a C- in French 1100 to continue to French 1200. In this course, you will continue to progress in speaking, listening reading and writing in French. Since using the language is the goal of the course, rather than mere passive knowledge of the rules, participation in class is essential. The course is conducted primarily in French, and you will be expected to ask and answer questions, interact with other students, and participate actively in French. Because the study of a foreign language is cumulative – with each new lesson building on structures and vocabulary from previous lessons – it is extremely important that you do not fall behind in your work in French. You will usually have online homework that will prepare you for class. After each class, other required online and assigned homework will help you to practice the new lesson. The online work will help you memorize structures and vocabulary. Verb conjugations will need to be memorized at home. Finally, additional classroom practice will help you to actively use the vocabulary and structures you have worked on at home and to get out of it. Your participation is what will make the class fun! 

FRENCH 2100 - Elementary French III

Vanessa Awa, Florian Humbert, Marcel Tchatchou. MoTuWeTh

FRENCH 2100 is the continuation of French 1200 and is designed for those who have taken French 1200 or who have studied Elementary French elsewhere. You must have earned at least a C- in French 1200 to continue to French 2100. It offers further introduction to the French language and the many cultures it encompasses. Your course work will allow you to develop all four language skills: reading, speaking, listening and writing along with cultural background necessary to help you to communicate effectively in French. In order to expose you to as much French as possible and to develop your listening and speaking skills, this class is conducted in French. You will see that your ability to understand and to respond will develop quite rapidly. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand authentic dialogues and texts, engage in conversations on everyday topics and write compositions. Learning a new language can be very rewarding. We all hope that your experience will be positive and productive.

FRENCH 2005 - “Helping Haiti? Health, Healing, Illness in Haitian Popular Culture”

Valerie Kaussen, T/Th 2-3:15

This course introduces students to Haitian perceptions of health, illness, and healing through discussion of Haitian fiction, films, and personal narratives as well as ethnographies and travel narratives about Haiti.    As we explore these texts, we will learn about traditional Haitian ideas about the body and healing, as well as definitions of “sickness, and “health,”  which often derive from the traditions and religion of Haitian vodou.    In part due to the popularity of Haiti as a destination for US-based medical missions, we will also explore Haitian representations and perceptions of Western medicine and humanitarian medical aid.   Additionally, our study and discussions will focus on issues related to Global Health more generally:  the inseparability of illness from social and economic ills (poverty, violence, inequalities based on race, gender, and sexual orientation); health and human rights; healing and “magic” or spirituality; and the relationship between global humanitarianism and histories of colonialism.    Individual units will include “Colonial Medicine and Slavery”; “Healing and the Mind/Body split in the Vodou religion”;  “Tourism and the AIDS epidemic in Haiti” ;“Global Humanitarianism and Disaster,” and “Illness and the Environment.”    Some of the authors whose work we will read include Edwidge Danticat, Paul Farmer, Zora Neale Hurston, Kettly Mars, Junot Díaz, Dany Lafferière, Marie-Vieux Chauvet, Yannick Lahens, and Karen McCarthy Brown and Lourdes Champagne (“Mama Lola”).

FRENCH 2160 - Intermediate Composition and Conversation

M. J. Muratore, T/TH 9:30-10:45

This course is the gateway course leading to a major or minor in French and is designed to further develop written and oral communication skills in French. Structured review of linguistic essentials (grammar, syntax, usage, phonetics) are achieved via systematic review, guided compositional production, and targeted exercises focusing on both fundamentals and enhancements. Videos on France’s major cities and on cultural topics of interest provide students with authentic models, which, in turn, sharpen aural acuity and verbal facility. Coursework includes relevant exercises, oral presentations, written compositions, and frequent quizzes, all geared to ensure mastery of essentials and contextualized applications. Prerequisite: French 2100 or equivalent.

FRENCH 3005 - La France Contemporaine

Daniel Sipe, T/Th 9:30-10:45 

This course is intended to provide students with an opportunity to critically examine cultural, political, and social issues pertinent to contemporary French society. The course components will be mainly grouped by theme (rap music, urbex, Calais migration camp, #metoo, etc.) Students will come to a better understanding of the historical causes of major trends and developments in contemporary French society by identifying and studying these trends. 

Successful students will:

  1. Develop a broad knowledge and understanding of major cultural, economic and political issues in contemporary France;
  2. Hone analytical skills that will allow them to comprehend political, social and cultural objects through the study of contemporary art, media, film, and the Internet;
  3. Seek to understand France by looking at the social challenges the nation faces today (religion, race relations, E.U., unemployment, etc.) Analyze how institutions and individuals have sought to engage with these challenges (government, education, associations, individuals); and
  4. Apply and enhance language/analytical skills acquired in previous French courses.
FRENCH 3430 - Masterworks in French Literature: Texts and Contexts

M. J. Muratore, T/TH 12:30-1:45

Spring 2021 topic: Classicism through Postmodernism

In this course, we will explore iconic French texts from Classicism to Post-modernism (with selections from novels, theater and poetry). Works under consideration will be examined in terms of their impact on world literature.  Principal emphasis will be accorded to the ways in which such masterpieces retain relevance today, the eternal human enigmas they bring to light, the artistry which has contributed to their status as sustained models of literary prominence. We will question in what inspiring ways such writings have shaped views of human nature, social justice, and humanistic-moral values—and how these bespeak issues of our contemporary world. Students will be exposed to the essential techniques of critical reading and interpretation and will apply analytical skills acquired and honed to a broad spectrum of written assignments.  Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 3410 or equivalent.  

FRENCH 4004 - What Does it Mean to be a Citizen? Anti-Racism, #BLM & Feminist Responses to Universalim in France

Megan Moore, T/Th 2-3:15 ONLINE

This course focuses on the intersection of a long and complicated history of race politics and gender violence at the heart of the conversations around Black Lives Matter and #metoo in the French-speaking world.  Beginning with the history of France’s “color-blind” universalism written into its constitution, and attentive to the histories of oppression which some Francophone feminists have fought and some have also participated in propagating, this class will explore how feminists are critiquing contemporary French assumptions about equality and discourses of citizenship and rights in film and documentary, on Twitter, in the press, and in literature.  Special attention will be given to Christiane Taubira, Rokhaya Diallo, Amandine Gay, and Lauren Bastide.  In French.

FRENCH 4720 - Structure of Modern French

Rebecca Grollemund, T/Th 12:30-1:45

This course will provide an overview of the structures of the French language. Students will study basic concepts in general linguistics as well as examine modern French from the following perspectives: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.

Pierre R Leon, Parth Bhatt (2005): Structure du français moderne : Introduction à l'analyse linguistique (French Edition)

FRENCH 4993 - Passeport Culturel

Megan Moore, ONLINE

Register for this online capstone in conjunction with our passeport culturel series of events, lectures, films & zoom meetings offered in French throughout the year.  After completing 12 events, enroll in the course to complete and present your final capstone project in French and get credit towards completing your French major or minor. 

FRENCH 7004 - Francophone Feminisms & Race in the Age of BLM & #metoo

Megan Moore, T/Th 2-3:15

This course focuses on the intersection of a long and complicated history of race politics and gender violence at the heart of the conversations around Black Lives Matter and #metoo in the French-speaking world.  Beginning with the history of France’s “color-blind” universalism written into its constitution, and attentive to the histories of oppression which some Francophone feminists have fought and some have also participated in propagating, this class will explore how feminists are critiquing contemporary French assumptions about equality and discourses of citizenship and rights in film and documentary, on Twitter, in the press, and in literature.  Special attention will be given to Christiane Taubira, Rokhaya Diallo, Amandine Gay, and Lauren Bastide.  In French.

FRENCH 7720 - Structure of Modern French

Rebecca Grollemund, T/Th 12:30-1:45

FRENCH 8087 - Seminar in French – La Géographie du désir

Daniel Sipe, Th 3:30-6

Nos désirs sont certainement itinérants mais pourrait-on dire qu’ils « se promènent » dans le monde en nous orientant vers des satisfactions ? Et si tel est le cas, comment est-ce que les désirs peuvent être compris comme étant sous-jacents à une structuration propre au monde, c’est-à-dire à une ordonnance de l’espace vécu qui serait également une révélation d’une topographie intime de la pensée  ? Dans ce cours nous allons nous pencher sur la question du désir compris dans son aspect « géographique » pour voir s’il y a correspondance entre les chemins invisibles de la passion et les itinéraires tracés par l’individu qui part à la découverte de ses bonheurs.

GERMAN 3190 - Contemporary German Culture

Seth Howes, Online

In this course students will become familiar with 20th century German history through film, music, visual art, and print culture. They will learn to discuss (and critique!) cultural artifacts in German, and to identify major themes, genres, movements, and styles (e.g. Expressionism, neorealism, film noir, Krautrock, industrial music). Taught in German; beginning written and oral comprehension of German required. 

GERMAN 3510W Journ 3510W PeaSt 3510W TAM 3010W / GERMAN 3510HW PeaSt 3510HW (cross-listed)

Monika Fischer, Online

Think Global: Fundamentals of Globalization & Digital Technologies

This inter-departmental course focuses on dynamics of globalization and its impact on cultures around the world from various interdisciplinary perspectives.  Readings will address and evaluate the roles of social, entrepreneurial, non-profit and for-profit organizations and their use of transformational technologies in a global setting as well as introduce students to fundamental problems and concepts of today’s global society. Emphasis is placed upon cultural diversity, life in an interconnected and precarious world, and the analysis of new media environments.

A primary concern of the course will be the examination of the contradictions and paradoxes of globalization, which, on the one hand, generates economic and geographical processes with significant social consequences due to rapid growth, population movements, political change, and creation of a vast gap between global wealth and poverty.  Yet, on the other hand, globalization can present new opportunities for groups and individuals (mostly in developing countries) who have struggled historically to find a viable place in the world economy.

--Students who pursue the Certificate of Digital Global Studies will identify and discuss their experiential learning program for the “hands-on” experience (internships; study abroad; service learning). This is a required component of the certificate but not a requirement for this course. http://cdig.missouri.edu

This course is Writing Intensive and offers Honors sections.

GERMAN 3605 / Black Studies 3605 - Black Central Europe: The Cultural History of Africans and People of African Descent in the German-Speaking Lands, from Antiquity to the Present

Kristin Kopp, Online

This course is designed to disrupt the ways in which we’ve come to think about “race” and racism by shifting our attention away from America to focus instead on the long history of Africans and their descendants in Central Europe. We’ll start our historical journey over a thousand years before the European discovery of the Americas. Here, in Ancient Europe, we’ll see Africans in positions of power and skin color mattering little. Over the ages, we’ll follow the routes of Black migrants and travelers, of servants and soldiers, of artists and activists who shaped the course of Central European history.

GERMAN 4810 / PeaSt 4810 / TAM 4810 - Case Studies in an Inter/Multicultural World

Monika Fischer, Online

This course examines the ways in which people across the globe are affected every day by an unprecedented array of linkages that defy geographic and political boundaries. As our point of reference, we will concentrate on three case studies. The first is an analysis of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular SDG Goal One that addresses ending extreme poverty. We will analyze the goals, look at how and where they are implemented and analyze their future impact with the spotlight on Africa and its relations with former colonial powers.

The second case study looks at strategic visions and shifting alliances in the Middle East and how history and global relations have reshaped that region in the 20th and 21st century. We will analyze the mixed reputation of geopolitics and compare current geopolitical developments in Iran and Turkey to Kinzer’s “grand strategy” for the Middle East.

The third case study analyzes the presence of Islam in Europe and how it plays out in politics and culture in particular in regards to Europe’s border crisis and the new changing configurations of migration from Africa. Another focus is on gender issues in Northern-African Islamic societies, which is becoming a prominent socio-political issue in European politics due to the influx of Muslim immigrants. With recent events and the rise of terrorist actions around the world an understanding of Islam and the roots of Islamophobia is crucial for a peaceful world.

Furthermore, this course counts as one of the two core courses for the certificate of digital global studies which is a required component of the certificate but not a requirement for this course. http://cdig.missouri.edu

GERMAN 4980 - German Capstone

Seth Howes, Online

The MU course catalog notes that this capstone course “focuses on contemporary Germany and brings together aspects of German literature and culture studies during the degree program.” So it will. Working together with the instructor, the class will design a semester-length course of study pertaining to contemporary culture and society in German-speaking world, and bespeaking their academic and professional interests. In addition to engaging with prose of various kinds, films, music, and other cultural objects, students will select topics of study, develop research questions and writing assignment prompts, and formulate assessment rubrics according to which the effectiveness of both individual and group work will be judged. Taught bilingually, in German and English, with intermediate to advanced reading and listening knowledge of both languages required. 

GERMAN 7005 - From Realism to Modernism: A Survey of Prose Fiction

Sean Ireton, Tu/Th 2:00-3:15. Format: In class/face to face.

This seminar explores key prose texts (mainly novels and novellas) written by German, Austrian, and Swiss authors between approximately 1850 and 1930. Authors and texts include: Droste-Huelshoff, Die Judenbuche; Stifter, Granit; Keller, Romeo und Julia auf dem Dorfe; Ebner-Eschenbach, Krambambuli; Hauptmann, Bahnwaerter Thiel; Schnitzler, Lieutenant Gustl; Rilke, Die Aufzeichnungen des Malte Laurids Brigge; Hesse, Der Steppenwolf; and Kafka, Die Verwandlung. (Conducted in German, with a reduced reading load for 4005 undergraduates.)

ITAL 1200 - Elementary Italian II

Lisa Bragg

Sec 01  MoTuWeThFri 10:00-10:50am in person  – Lab: online asynchronous (6 credits)

Sec 02  MoTuWeThFri. 11:00-11:50am in person – Lab: online asynchronous (6 credits)

This course offers an introduction to the Italian language and culture. It was designed  specifically  for  students  who  have  taken  Italian  1100,  or  an equivalent class. Students will develop skills in four primary language areas: reading, speaking, listening, and writing.

All classes will be conducted primarily in Italian with the ultimate goal of students practicing the four skills continually throughout the lesson. By the end of this semester, the student will be able to understand simple texts, video and audio files, engage in brief conversations on everyday topics and write short compositions. The learner will know enough words and phrases to understand and communicate with native speakers on a basic level.

With this 6-credit course the language requirement will be completed. If the student  should  decide  to  pursue  a  Minor  in  Italian,  the  skills  acquired  from this course are needed for higher-level language study.

ITAL 2005 - Italian Culture: Truths or Myths?

Lisa Bragg,  Tu/Th 2-3:15pm - Face to Face traditional in classroom setting.

This course offers an overview of Italian culture, presented by themes such as history, geography, economy, religion, politics, values and traditions. It has been designed specifically for undergraduate students seeking an enjoyable 3-credit humanities elective: the course applies to any major. This course also fulfills a 3-credit allowance for a Minor in Italian. 

The class will be held in English language but students will learn a few Italian words and basic conversation sentences. 

Students will gain an understanding of Italy's country and population, through its culture while analyzing the truth or the stereotype within the subjects analyzed. Classes will be very interactive with several discussion opportunities. Assignments will be mainly in the form of PowerPoint Presentations, but room will be given for other forms of verification of knowledge acquired. 

By the end of this semester, the student will have a better grasp of Italian Culture, first hand, from a native Italian instructor. The learner will enjoy pictures, videos, music, stories, articles about Italy, which will be followed by open discussion time in every class. 

JAPNSE 1200 - Elementary Japanese II

Chieko Kellar, TuTh 9:30-10:45, 11:00-12:15
Eric Lancaster, MoWeFr 10:00-10:50

For beginners with some prior knowledge of Japanese. Three hours of lecture instruction and three hours of practice/drill per week in small groups.

Credit Hours: 6

Prerequisites: C- or better in JAPNSE 1100, or equivalent

JAPNSE 3160 - Intermediate Japanese Composition and Conversation

Eric Lancaster, MoWeFr 1:00-1:50

Further develops oral and written command of Japanese as well as listening comprehension and further essay writing skills.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: C- or better in JAPNSE 2160

JAPNSE 3380 - Intermediate Japanese II

This course aims 1. to develop communicative skills based on the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary and conversational expressions. 2. to develop speaking and listening proficiency to carry out simple conversation. 3. to develop reading skills to understand short and simple materials. 4. to develop writing skills to be able to write short essays. 

Prerequisite: C - or better in Japanese 3160 or permission of instructor

 

KOREAN 1200 - Elementary Korean II

Eunyoung Choi, MTWR 11:00-12:15

In Elementary Korean II, students will extend their Korean vocabulary and grammar as an extension of Elementary Korean I. Based on what they learned in class, students will learn how to make more complex sentences. They will have various games to develop and check their vocabulary and grammar skills. These games will also teach the importance of collaboration. In Elementary Korean II, students will be expected to read more advanced Korean stories and learn more Korean songs. Each week, there will be composition homework assignments with a different topic. Students should be able to write a paragraph based on what they have learned each week and will exchange their thoughts and comments about their writing in class. 

KOREAN 2320 - The Korean Civlization II

Sanghun Chun, TR 2:00-3:15 pm

This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of Korean society by exploring the story of historical, political, economic, and cultural characteristics after the Korean War.  South Korea is known as a country that has successfully transformed itself into both an economic and cultural powerhouse and its democracy in a short period of time.  In my opinion, though South Korea is known for a homogeneous and distinctive culture and identity it is also experiencing many paradoxical aspects and changes in the rapid process of economic development and democratic consolidation.   I assume this also applies to Inter-Korea relations (North and South Korea).

By the end of the semester, students will have a contextual background of Korean society and culture nowadays.  Students will also be able to further develop this insight to understand and discuss major issues of Korean studies in other upper level classes.

KOREAN 3160 - Intermediate Korean II

Eunyoung Choi, MWF 9:00-9:50 am

Intermediate Korean II is designed to increase your advanced Korean ability as an extension of Intermediate Korean I. To increase your language ability, it is important to be exposed to many different situations. With this in consideration, this class provides different themes each week, such as a song week, and a literature week to give students exposure to different situations. This class will especially focus on speaking and writing. It is important for students to actively participate in small groups during class and in individual projects. There will be composition homework assignments each week with different topics. Students should be able to do their homework based on what they have learned each week. 

KOREAN 4220 - The North Korean Politics

Wang Sik Kim, MW 2:00-3:15 pm

This course is designed to help student understand the dynamics of North Korean politics.  North Korea can be described as an exceptional country in many ways.  First, the transfer of power in the North Korea was made through the hereditary succession like a monarchy even though it claimed to be a socialist country.  Second, North Korea has survived as a socialist country, while most of the communist countries including the Soviet Union and East European countries collapsed in the late 1980s and the early 1990s.  Third, the North Korea, one of the poorest countries, has developed the nuclear weapons as well as other weapons of mass destruction, threatening the international security. For critical understanding of the North Korean politics I will trace the Korean communist movement, and deal with the North Korean political history since 1945.  I am also planning to deal with the ideology and important governmental structure including the Korean Workers’ party, the Military and the social control structures.  Then I will examine the current issues including economic reforms, the nuclear challenge, and the several issues with the South Korea like unification questions and the conclusion of the peace treaty to end the Korean War.

KOREAN 4260 - The Korea Diaspora

Seungkwon You, MW 3:30-4:45 pm

This course is an interdisciplinary course related to the phenomenon of migration and settlement from Korea.  The course seeks to deepen our understanding of the ways in which Korean immigrants have shaped and continue to shape social thought as well as institutions in the United States, Japan, and China.  The course draws upon literature, history, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Koreans living in the U.S., Japan, and China.  Through reading critical literatures, we will address issues such as immigration history, race/ethnicity, racism and resistance, gender and sexuality, culture and identity, labor, migration and globalization, class, education, religion.  The format for this course is that of a lecture/discussion. It is important that the student complete all readings prior to the sessions, and participate.  Students should come to each session prepared with questions and ideas for discussion.

PORT 3885 / FILMS_VS 3885 / SPAN 3885 - Twenty-First Century South American Cinema

Jack Draper

This course is intended to give a broad overview of the major contemporary national cinemas in South America. Over the course of the semester, students will view approximately 14 feature films from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay, released in the 21st century. The instructor will provide a thematic framework for these films within the context of Latin American cinematic history and cultural studies. Some of the cultural and cinematic themes covered in course lectures and readings will include: local, national and transnational imaginaries and markets (the space of the city, sub-national regions, the nation, and supranational spaces and regions including Mercosur, South America, Latin America, the globe and international markets); avant-garde filmic styles vs. traditional Hollywood style or Latin American melodrama; horror, suspense, the road movie and other universal genres; utopias and utopic imagery/narratives; national and transnational dialogues and influences on contemporary South American filmmakers; and last but not least some humanist and emotional themes—making visible class, racial/ethnic and gender identities and subaltern struggles for justice and equality; family drama/melodrama, friendship and romance/sexuality. Language note: lectures and readings will be in English; films will be screened with dialogue in original language (Spanish or Portuguese mainly) with English subtitles.

RUSS 1200 - Elementary Russian II

Elena Doludenko, MoTuWeThFr 11:00 - 11:50 AM, Lab Th 2:2:50 PM, 3:30-4:20 PM 

Russian 1200 is the second course in the two-semester elementary Russian sequence. By the end of the course you will be able to: present basic personal information; participate in conversations to fulfill some immediate needs, e.g. ordering food; communicate in basic contexts related to everyday life using short statements; present orally and in a written form information using learned vocabulary and structures; understand some information from sentence-length speech in basic personal and social contexts; understand some information from the simplest connected written texts dealing with a limited number of personal and social needs. Elementary Russian or its equivalent is also a prerequisite for majoring and minoring in Russian.

RUSS 2160 - 2nd year Russian II

Elena Doludenko, MoTuWeTh 10:00 - 10:50 AM

Russian 2160 is the second course in the two-semester intermediate Russian sequence. By the end of the course you will be able to: converse with ease and confidence when dealing with the routine tasks and social situations; communicate information about work, school, recreation, particular interests, and areas of competence in sentences or series of sentences; narrate and describe in different time frames about everyday events and situations; understand, with ease and confidence, simple sentence-length speech in basic personal and social contexts; understand fully and with ease short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with personal and social topics; understand some connected texts featuring description and narration.

RUSS 2350 - Understanding Russia through Film

Martha Kelly (3 credits, online, asynchronous, second 8-week semester)

How does the Russian-speaking world see itself? This asynchronous, 8-week online course will use film to explore how Russian speakers themselves understand Russia. We will watch 8 major Russian-language films from the post-Soviet era (starting in 1990) that depict moments in Russian history from the middle ages to the present. And we will critically consider what these representations of Russian history and culture suggest about Russian identity today, with special attention to how these films present difference (ethnic, political, religious, gender, sexual, etc.), or “otherness.” Instructional components will include film viewings, informational video lectures, online student discussion and remote small-group work. The final group project is a website for a film festival. No prerequisites.

RUSS 3005 - Russia Today

Nicole Monnier. 1 cr., Wednesdays 2-2:50 p.m. 

Russia Today is a one-credit course designed to help students explore contemporary Russian cultural issues in real time by introducing and sharing available online and print resources. After a short introduction to online resources, including how to find and critically evaluate them, students choose their own topics to research for the remainder of the course. These topics are the basis of weekly class presentations, led by one or two students who assign readings from their ongoing research to share and discuss. At the end of the semester, each student presents their final project based on their semester-long research. These projects may take a variety of forms (video, PowerPoint, academic essay, government white paper, creative writing piece, research poster, etc.) based on individual student interests and training (including major and career aspirations). No knowledge of Russian required, though students with Russian language skills will be encouraged to incorporate them into their research and projects as appropriate for their language levels. Humanities credit.

RUSS 3160 - Third-Year Russian II

Tim Langen, MoWeFr 11-11:50 am

Students in third-year Russian will use the skills and knowledge gained in earlier courses to engage with a large volume of native material. Your reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension will improve in tandem as you become able to read and enjoy increasingly sophisticated material and to discuss it in greater detail. By the end of the course, you will be able to read newspapers and similar native material, and you will also be able to converse about a range of topics, describing and narrating your experiences and debating opinions.

RUSS 3380 - Sinners, Saints, and Madmen: 19th Century Russian Literature

Tim Langen, MoWe 12:30-1:45 (3 credits, WI and non-WI option).

This course introduces students to some of the major works of nineteenth-century Russian literature, by authors such as Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. In addition to reading some of the most electrifying prose ever written anywhere, we will ask how it was that literary fiction became the primary way to discuss psychology, philosophy, and politics in Russia during this period. All readings in translation; no prerequisites.

RUSS 8405 - Russian Poetry: Poet, Public, Tradition

(3 credits, M 4.30-7pm)

Postwar celebrity poet Evgeny Evtushenko famously declared that a poet in Russia is “more than a poet.” Though now a platitude, this phrase evokes an important element of the Russian poetic tradition. This course will investigate modern Russian poetry from the eighteenth century through to the present, with special attention to the ways poets have positioned themselves as public figures or, at least, as a nation’s conscience—as well as ways poets have deconstructed and adapted that role in recent times. We will consider a diverse set of voices, including Russophone poets from beyond Russia and even English-language poets responding to the Russian poetic tradition. Poets include Alexander Pushkin, Marina Tsvetaeva, Osip Mandelstam, Joseph Brodsky, Shamshad Abdullaev, Maria Stepanova, Ilya Kaminsky and Eugene Ostashevsky. Readings will be available in Russian and English, and there is no prerequisite for the course. Non-Russian speakers are encouraged to sign up. Approaches include collaborative analysis and practice of poetic translation. 

SPAN 1100 - Elementary Spanish I

Rosa Morales, Coordinator.  Multiple time slots available. Hybrid 

This course, which is designed for students who have fewer than two years of previous experience in Spanish, offers an introduction to the Spanish language and the many cultures it encompasses. The course work will allow students to develop all four language skills: reading, speaking, listening, and writing along with the cultural background necessary to help them to communicate effectively in Spanish.   This class is conducted primarily in Spanish. 

SPAN 1200 - Elementary Spanish II

Noah Myers, Coordinator.  Multiple time slots available.  Hybrid 

This course offers a second-semester introduction to the Spanish language and the many cultures it encompasses.  It is designed for students who have taken Spanish 1100 or who have more than two years of previous experience studying Spanish.  Students will develop their skills in the areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening while learning advanced grammatical structures and vocabulary through topics such as daily routine, food, relationships, health, technology and the household. 

SPAN 1200H - Elementary Spanish II Honors

Dawn Heston, 10:00-10:50.  Hybrid.

This course offers a second-semester introduction to the Spanish language and the many cultures it encompasses.  It was designed specifically for honors students who have taken Spanish 1100 or an equivalent class.  Students will be able to maintain basic conversations on a variety of topics including: food and restaurants, daily routine, health, technology and the household after taking this class. In the honors section, there is a greater emphasis placed on the integration of target language resources, interpretation of texts, cultural information, and authentic projects.

SPAN 2100 - Elementary Spanish III

Carlos Mendez, Coordinator.  Multiple time slots available. M-Th. Hybrid 

This course, designed for students who have taken Spanish 1200 or an equivalent course. It offers further introduction to the Spanish language and the many cultures it encompasses. Your course work will allow you to develop all four language skills: reading, speaking, listening and writing along with the cultural background necessary to help you to communicate effectively in Spanish. In order to expose you to as much Spanish as possible and to develop your listening and speaking skills, this class is conducted in Spanish. You will see that your ability to understand and to respond will develop quite rapidly. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand authentic dialogues and texts, engage in conversations on everyday topics and write compositions. Learning a new language can be very rewarding. We all hope that your experience will be positive and productive.

SPAN 2100H - Elementary Spanish III Honors

Carlos Mendez, M-Th 11:00-11:50.  Hybrid. 

This honors course is designed for students who have taken Spanish 1200 or an equivalent course. The course seeks to improve students’ fluency in Spanish and to expose them to the many cultures it encompasses. Your course work will allow you to develop all four language skills: reading, speaking, listening and writing along with the   cultural background necessary to help you to communicate effectively in Spanish. In order to expose you to as much Spanish as possible and to develop your listening and speaking skills, this class is conducted in Spanish. You will see that your ability to understand and to respond will develop quite rapidly. This course may integrate cultural events outside the classroom as well such as movies, guest lectures, art exhibits, seminars or concerts as available. Once a semester, the students may also meet with Honors Spanish 1100 and 1200 students as a cohort group for further intellectual exchange and enrichment. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand communicative acts and read texts from primary Spanish sources, engage in conversations on a variety of topics, and write compositions about your thoughts and opinions on matters studied in class. Learning a new language can be very rewarding. I all hope that your experience will be positive and productive.

SPAN 2160 - Intermediate Spanish Conversation and Composition

Dawn Heston, T/Th 11:00-12:15, Section 3. 

Span 2160 is specifically designed to enhance the writing and speaking skills of intermediate-level students.  Students will further develop their abilities using expanded topics related to current events, cultural topics, personal experiences in different time frames (past, present, future) and real-life oriented scenarios.  The speaking and writing portions of this class are balanced equally and developed through a variety of class projects.  Regular class interaction with an emphasis on authentic communication is a major component of the course.  Prerequisite: Span 2100 or equivalent course.

SPAN 2160H - Intermediate Spanish Conversation and Composition Honors

Pablo Serna, T/TH 9:30-10:45, Section 1.

Spanish 2160H is the fourth semester of Spanish designed for honors students who have completed the      elementary Spanish sequence at MU or equivalent pre-requisite classes. This class is fundamentally different from other 2160 classes in that it focuses on the application and refinement of grammatical concepts through the introduction of new vocabulary and cultural topics. In this course it is assumed that students have mastered the vocabulary and    grammatical concepts taught in the elementary levels. Therefore, this course will continue to focus on refining the four language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening through the use of authentic texts, group activities, and the incorporation of cultural activities throughout the semester.

Special attention is given to oral production as well and students are expected to actively participate every day of class. As students participate in many, mostly oral, guided activities, their speaking ability will improve in both accuracy and fluency. Students also will be expected to do a significant amount of reading and writing in this section of 2160. The semester will culminate with the completion of a writing portfolio that will display all of the grammatical skills that students worked on throughout the semester as well as a multimedia project and presentation on a current cultural topic.  

SPAN 2330 / Black Studies 2005 / Peace Studies 2005 - Latin American Civilization

Jack Draper (Diversity Intensive Course)

This course provides an introduction to Latin American history, culture and society from the colonial period (late 1400s through early 1800s) to the present day. The course includes a strong focus on the contributions to Latin American culture/history/society of non-European peoples, particularly Africans, Afro-Latin Americans, and indigenous peoples and their descendants, as well as the influence of the Spanish and Portuguese colonizers and, to a lesser extent, other colonial powers and later immigrants from other parts of the world. Course texts and lectures will cover important historical and cultural developments such as pre-Columbian civilizations; first contact between Europeans and indigenous peoples; development of colonial agriculture, plantations, mining, and urban centers; independence struggles; the formation of national identities and nation states; debates over civilization and barbarism; indigenous and African slavery, the transatlantic slave trade, and resistance to slavery as well as abolition; revolutions, revolts and coups d’état; the development of a regional identity (“Nuestra América”); democratic struggles and social movements; illustrative examples of Latin American literature, music, film and popular culture; in addition to historical relations with the United States, among other elements of this transcontinental civilization. Related films screened in the course will include Zama (Lucrecia Martel, 2018), Machuca (Andrés Wood, 2004), A Place Called Chiapas (Nettie Wild, 1998), and The Edge of Democracy (Petra Costa, 2019). Language note: course lectures and readings are in English; films screened will be either in English, or if in another language (typically Spanish or Portuguese), the films will have English subtitles.

SPAN 3150 - Advanced Spanish Conversation

Carlos Mendez, MWF 12:00-1:00

Spanish 3150 is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 2160, or for those students who have been placed at this level. You must possess an ample knowledge of the grammar rules and know how to use them in context to succeed in this class. This class will help you improve on the production of the Spanish language to be able to communicate in daily life situations and also to express your opinion about different topics of concern.

SPAN 3160 - Advanced Spanish Composition

Joseph Désiré Otabela, MWF

SPAN 3160 is designed to improve writing skills in Spanish and strategies in critical thinking through extensive and intensive reading of Spanish literature. This course will develop analytical skills required for advanced Spanish literacy and literary studies and provide students with plenty of Spanish language input and opportunities for negotiation of meaning and meaningful interaction. The course will help students integrate their linguistic knowledge into a broader context of cultural and social background through expanding their Spanish readings skills and appreciation for literature.

SPAN 3420 - Introduction to Hispanic Literature I

J. Cordones-Cook

Course objectives:

  1. To teach students the basic skills of literary analysis through close readings of narrative (short story, novel) representative of major periods and movements in Hispanic letters including authors from Spain and a wide rage of Spanish American countries. 
  2. To assist students in the acquisition of the critical vocabulary required for textual analysis in Spanish.
  3. To encourage students to communicate meaningfully in a second language by using oral communication and writing.
  4. This is not a grammar course, however students will have to keep reviewing the different areas of grammar as needed and/or as suggested by the professor. Professor recommends very strongly to thoroughly review verb conjugations, the use of: preterit and imperfect, subjunctive, object pronouns, verbs like gustar, etc. Keep on hand a basic Spanish grammar book or a good internet Spanish grammar reference.
SPAN 3430 - Introduction to Hispanic Literature II (Poetry and Drama)

Joseph Désiré Otabela, MWF 10:00-10:50. Face to Face
Mar Soria, TTh 9:30-10:45am. Online. Synchronous.

Has a friend asked you what you thought about the last movie you watched or the last book you read? Most people answering this question would say, in case they liked it, that the characters were fun and the story interesting. However, if you consider every element that authors use to create a novel, a poem, a play or a film, you would be surprised how much more there is to portraying “interesting” characters and a “fun” story.

In this class we are going to learn how to read and interpret key Hispanic plays and poems through readings, discussions, and written analysis. We will investigate what the literary text talks about and how the text tells us such a story. In order to do this, the student will acquire the necessary tools—method, terminology, and concepts—required for a critical study of Hispanic drama and poetry. The reading and analysis of these works would not be complete without becoming familiar with the Hispanic socio-cultural context where they appeared. Therefore, we will also explore the major cultural movements and historical events that shaped these texts. 

SPAN 3885 / FILMS_VS 3885 / PORT 3885 - Twenty-First Century South American Cinema

Jack Draper

This course is intended to give a broad overview of the major contemporary national cinemas in South America. Over the course of the semester, students will view approximately 14 feature films from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay, released in the 21st century. The instructor will provide a thematic framework for these films within the context of Latin American cinematic history and cultural studies. Some of the cultural and cinematic themes covered in course lectures and readings will include: local, national and transnational imaginaries and markets (the space of the city, sub-national regions, the nation, and supranational spaces and regions including Mercosur, South America, Latin America, the globe and international markets); avant-garde filmic styles vs. traditional Hollywood style or Latin American melodrama; horror, suspense, the road movie and other universal genres; utopias and utopic imagery/narratives; national and transnational dialogues and influences on contemporary South American filmmakers; and last but not least some humanist and emotional themes—making visible class, racial/ethnic and gender identities and subaltern struggles for justice and equality; family drama/melodrama, friendship and romance/sexuality. Language note: lectures and readings will be in English; films will be screened with dialogue in original language (Spanish or Portuguese mainly) with English subtitles.

SPAN 4004 - Topics in Spanish: Borders, Barrios, and Bridges: Latino/a Literatures in the United States

Adriana Méndez Rodenas, Tue/Thurs 11:00 a.m.-12: 15 p.m.  Format: on line; synchronous  - Taught in English

At our present vantage-point in the twenty-first century, Latino/a writers and artists in the United States have forged a vibrant, innovative literature and art that addresses their experience of migration, adaptation, and acculturation within the broader Anglo-American culture.  Written mostly in English, with a sprinkling of “Spanglish,” these works appear in all genres:  memoir, short story, novel, theater, poetry, and film.  This course examines the literature produced by the three main national/ethnic groups that compose the Hispanic population in the United States:  Chicano (Mexican-American), Puerto Rican, and Cuban-American. It is structured around three poignant spatial metaphors--borders, barrios, and bridges—that define the immigrant experience of these groups: Chicanos of the mythical Aztlán; Puerto Rican air bridges in-between San Juan and New York; the flight of post-1959 Cuban-American exiles and émigrés to Miami and New York.  We will examine the way Chicano/a writers have redefined the U.S./ Mexico border as well as the process of community formation in barrios like Little Havana in Miami or Chicano neighborhoods in Chicago. Other topics covered: bilingualism, double attachments to home and adopted country, family ties and gender roles, the process of identity-formation in the U.S., racial and ethnic identities, and the uses of memory.

Students will reflect on how the Latino/a immigrant experience contributes to U.S. society. Heritage students will reflect on how Latino/a literature enhances their own sense of identity and community.  Requirements. Undergraduates: two brief reflexiones or reader’s response essays; a final project presented in artistic/creative/digital format and accompanied by an 8-10 page essay. Graduate students will also present an in-class report on one of the critical readings and a longer research paper (15-20 pages).

Textbook:
Ilán Stavans, Editor.  The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature. New York/London: W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.  Critical readings from various anthologies placed on Reserve, Main Library.

Films:
León Ichaso, El super (1979);  Luis Valdez, Zoot Suit (2003).

SPAN 4461 - Advanced Spanish Civilization

Mar Soria, T/Th 12:30-1:45. Online. Taught in Spanish

This survey explores major historical periods and cultural movements in the Iberian Peninsula since the pre-Roman period to present-day Spain. By analyzing a variety of high- and low-brow cultural manifestations such as literary texts, paintings, cuisine, music, and architectural creations, students will be encouraged to question dominant narratives of Spanish national identity across the centuries and understand history and culture as ideas subject to manipulation and multiple interpretations. 

SPAN 7004 - Topics in Spanish: Borders, Barrios, and Bridges: Latino/a Literatures in the United States

Adriana Méndez Rodenas,  Tue/Thurs 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.  Format: on line; synchronous  - Taught in English

At our present vantage-point in the twenty-first century, Latino/a writers and artists in the United States have forged a vibrant, innovative literature and art that addresses their experience of migration, adaptation, and acculturation within the broader Anglo-American culture.  Written mostly in English, with a sprinkling of “Spanglish,” these works appear in all genres:  memoir, short story, novel, theater, poetry, and film.  This course examines the literature produced by the three main national/ethnic groups that compose the Hispanic population in the United States:  Chicano (Mexican-American), Puerto Rican, and Cuban-American. It is structured around three poignant spatial metaphors--borders, barrios, and bridges—that define the immigrant experience of these groups: Chicanos of the mythical Aztlán; Puerto Rican air bridges in-between San Juan and New York; the flight of post-1959 Cuban-American exiles and émigrés to Miami and New York.  We will examine the way Chicano/a writers have redefined the U.S./ Mexico border as well as the process of community formation in barrios like Little Havana in Miami or Chicano neighborhoods in Chicago. Other topics covered: bilingualism, double attachments to home and adopted country, family ties and gender roles, the process of identity-formation in the U.S., racial and ethnic identities, and the uses of memory.

Students will reflect on how the Latino/a immigrant experience contributes to U.S. society. Heritage students will reflect on how Latino/a literature enhances their own sense of identity and community.  Requirements. Undergraduates: two brief reflexiones or reader’s response essays; a final project presented in artistic/creative/digital format and accompanied by an 8-10 page essay. Graduate students will also present an in-class report on one of the critical readings and a longer research paper (15-20 pages).

Textbook:
Ilán Stavans, Editor.  The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature. New York/London: W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.  Critical readings from various anthologies placed on Reserve, Main Library.

Films:
León Ichaso, El super (1979);  Luis Valdez, Zoot Suit (2003).

SPAN 7461 - Advanced Spanish Civilization

Mar Soria, T/Th 12:30-1:45. Online. Taught in Spanish.

This survey explores major historical periods and cultural movements in the Iberian Peninsula since the pre-Roman period to present-day Spain. By analyzing a variety of high- and low-brow cultural manifestations such as literary texts, paintings, cuisine, music, and architectural creations, students will be encouraged to question dominant narratives of Spanish national identity across the centuries and understand history and culture as ideas subject to manipulation and multiple interpretations.