Jesse Hall
On

Courses

Fall 2021

Lamya Najem, MTR 4-5:50 pm

(6 credits)

After successful completion of this course, students will have mastered the Arabic alphabet and sound system, and write accurately from dictation. They will be able to talk and write about self, education, and family with native Arabs. Students will also Know about the differences between formal and spoken Arabic, recognize both registers, and be able to use basic expressions in at least one dialect. They will have an active vocabulary of about 300 Arabic words. Students will also be able to initiate social interactions, ask for basic information, and be aware of basic cultural aspects of Arab world.

 

Shakir Hamoodi, Tue/Thurs 3:30 - 4:45 PM

This course gives the learner a clear understanding of Arab culture, including historical perspective, geography, Arts, Language, diversity, and modern interaction between the US and the Arab World.  Students who have interest in that part of the world will find this course very useful, if not a must. This course is conducted in English.

Lamya Najem, Tue/Thurs 6-7:15 pm

(3 credits)

This course is a continuation of Arabic 1100 and 1200 and is designed for students who have completed the two courses or have an equivalent knowledge of Arabic.  It continues to provide students with the support they need to improve their communication skills in all of these five areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture of the Arabic-speaking world.  Students will acquire additional vocabulary and will read and write more complex materials.  The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing the learner in the context of the native-speaking environment.  The course will compare Arabic and American culture to help students understand the distinctive characteristics of the humanistic perspective by placing the historical and cultural factors in Arab countries in a global context. This humanistic perspective will be applied to values, experiences and meanings in one’s own life. 

Shakir Hamoodi, Tue/Thurs 5:00 - 6:15 PM

(3 credits)

This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: Listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab World. It expands communicative competence in Arabic and provides a good introduction to important aspects in Arabic Grammar. Oral and written skills also be emphasized, besides expanding students’ vocabulary. It will also help students develop an understanding of the Arabic culture and its growing importance in the world, while providing contexts that reinforce the usefulness of the Arabic language in today's global economy. This course is conducted in Arabic.

Michael Volz, Sec I: MTWRF 10-10:50 am, and W 11:00 - 11::50 pm (Lab)
Sec II: MTWRF 1:00 - 1:50 pm, and W 2:00 - 2:50 pm (Lab)

(6 credits)

After successful completion of this course, students will be able to communicate in Mandarin Chinese regarding everyday topics with a vocabulary of about 400 words.   Students will also have a solid foundation in the writing skills, linguistic structures, listening skills, and pronunciation necessary for further study of the language. 

Huichun Liang, Sec.I: Mon., Wed., Fri.12-12:50 pm. 

(3 credits)

This is the first course in the second-year Chinese series. This course is tailor made to meet the current need of student for further development of the four language skills building on the base already set in the first-year Chinese classes to support oral and written performance at the Intermediate level. Students will be exposed to approximately 300 new characters and 60 grammar patterns or usages to acquire throughout the course.

Michael Volz, T/Th 2-3:15

The goal of this course is for students to gain a basic understanding of the people, culture, and nation of present-day China.  Since the present cannot be understood without knowledge of the past, we will approach this goal by building knowledge of China's history, traditional religions, philosophy, arts, literature, food, customs, and language with a focus on how these traditional aspects of Chinese culture are manifested in and influence modern day China.   The course is divided into 3 broad themes:  Traditional China, Modern China, and Life and Arts in China.  Since this is a survey course, it is also hoped that students will come away with a desire to explore the subject more deeply.

Huichun Liang, Sec.I: Mon., Wed., Fri.3-3:50 pm.  

(3 credits)

This course aims to develop student’s competence in advanced Chinese with an emphasis on the improvement of reading, writing and speaking language skills. Different meaningful contexts will be created and provided. Students will be encouraged to actively involved and be engaged in different kinds of communicative tasks that require the use of the vocabulary words, grammatical patterns, discourse device, and cultural information learned in this class. Through learning and discussing the topics, such as childhood, describing a person, and music, students learn to express themselves descriptively, persuasively, critically, and philosophically. 

Huichun Liang, Sec.I: Mon., Wed., Fri.2-2:50 pm.  

(3 credits)

This course is a general introduction to the fiction, poetry, and essays of twentieth century China in the context of history. Students will read major works from the May 4th Period, the era of social realism, the Cultural Revolution, and the post-Mao era. Students are expected to savor the ingenuity of Chinese modern and contemporary Chinese literature and to conjure up pictures of Chinese literature development. Authors to be discussed include Lu Xun, Lao She, Ba Jin, Mao Dun, Ding Ling, Zhang Ailing, Xu Zhimo, Wang Meng, Su Tong, and women and native writers from Taiwan and Hong kong. Through studying these texts, we will approach these works for what they can tell us about the experience of living in a world of radical changes, but also to understand and appreciate their artistry and diversity as works of literature. All literature readings will be in English. No knowledge of Chinese language or culture is necessary.

Michael Volz, Sec.I: Tues, Thurs, 11:00am - 12:15pm

(3 credits)

As political, business, religious, and personal encounters between Chinese and Americans increase, so also does the need for competence in negotiating these cross-cultural interactions.  Whether hosting Chinese guests, visiting China for business or as a scholar, or simply trying to understand current events, a clear understanding of cultural differences and similarities can be quite valuable.  In order to cultivate such cultural sensibilities, students will be introduced to multiple perspectives on American and Chinese cultural differences along with narratives of cross-cultural experiences.   This course will address issues related to American and Chinese cross-cultural communication in five different spheres of interaction:  political, religious, business, interpersonal, and education. 

Daniel Sipe, T/Th 9:30-10:45 ONLINE

“Objects of Culture: French Civilization Revisited” introduces students to the culture, society, politics and history of France through a selection of objects from France’s past and present.  Throughout the semester we will look closely at “things” to discover what they tell us about the evolution of France as a nation and society.  What counts as an “object” in this course is quite broad: it might be a monument, an artwork, a cultural or political movement, an architectural space, a household appliance, a museum artifact, a type of food, a technology, or a machine, etc. Many lectures will focus on objects that have a special symbolic association with France, for example, “champagne” or “The Moulin Rouge,” while other lectures will focus on more common objects and their significance and history as part of everyday life in France, for example, “sidewalks” and “tapestries.” In each case, we will discuss the histories and symbolic meanings of these objects, and what they tell us about France’s cultural and social.

Valerie Kaussen, T/Th 12:30-1:45  HYBRID

Mary Jo Muratore,  T/Th 11-12:15  ONLINE

A linguistic journey of sorts, this course, conducted in French, is designed to expand and enhance French-language skills acquired at previous levels. The aim is multifocal with due emphasis on active engagement geared to develop oral fluency and written proficiency. To this end, discussions and essays will focus on diverse individual and collective experiences, current events, cultural phenomena, literary models and media excerpts, to which students will react and about which they will provide analysis and commentary -- orally and in writing.  Structural and stylistic complexities will be examined so as to foster correctness of expression, broadened linguistic scope and communicative effectiveness.  A suitable bridge course for subsequent excursions into cultural studies and textual analysis.  Prerequisite course: French 2160 or equivalent.

Daniel Sipe, T/Th 11-12:15  HYBRID

In this course you will begin to acquire skills that will help you to develop and defend critical perspectives. By critical perspectives, I am referring to a position of reasoned understanding concerning the world around us, especially as it is represented in literature, media, and popular culture. In this course you will refine this crucial skill by learning how to read, analyze, and write about cultural objects. You will find that these skills are useful in almost every area of life.

A critical perspective differs from a mere opinion in these important respects: one arrives at it through an adherence to rules of discovery and analysis; it proposes widely-accepted, reproducible methods; and its outcomes are communicated, for the most part, through stylistic and rhetorical conventions.

Of course this is not to say that, when looking at cultural objects, we can somehow plug data into analytical formulae and arrive at a “correct” answer; what it does imply for us, however, is that, as we consider the cultural field, there are definitely some perspectives that more clearly demonstrate this reasoned understanding of the objects and phenomenon under consideration. In this course you will therefore:

  • develop a basic structural understanding of four major genres of cultural expression (prose, poetry, theater, film), their commonalities and differences;
  • acquire analytical tools and critical vocabulary for analyzing each of these genres;
  • learn to write a coherent analytical essay using techniques of self- and peer correction, dictionary usage, and electronic spell-check;
  • refine your mastery of complex grammatical structure and stylistics;
  • … and all of this EN FRANÇAIS!

Valerie Kaussen, T/Th 2-3:15  HYBRID

Dawn Heston, T/Th 11:-12:15  In person

This course is for students who are interested in the teaching of foreign languages. It is intended to provide a foundation in the various ways to teach foreign languages, current second language acquisition research as it relates to teaching, and relevant lesson planning and implementation. Students in this course will be expected to interpret, analyze and integrate the information into their work.

The discussions and materials presented throughout the course foster understanding of the theoretical background of second language acquisition, the current methodologies in foreign language teaching with an emphasis on the communicative and interactive approach and the availability of resources (journals, organizations, publishing houses) within the foreign language teaching profession. Students in the course will also explore the practical applications of these methodologies in the classroom through the development of techniques, strategies, and activities to achieve communication and enhance student motivation. With these communicative and interactive objectives in mind, students will create assessment procedures, evaluate and select teaching materials, design supplementary materials and explore the use of technology in the classroom.

Mary Jo Muratore, T/Th 12:30-1:45  ONLINE

This course explores the diverse and complex experience of contemporary black writers of French expression as manifest in a span of 20th and 21st century foundational texts. Historical, geographical and social phenomena will foreground in-depth, multi-focal analyses of the figures encountered: voices of the alienated and marginalized, outcries of the oppressed and forlorn, pleas for liberation and identity. Students will engage with, and negotiate, the poetic strategies that define and enucleate the unicity of the text, the inherent constraints of language, while examining the nature of each work’s collective implications. In sum, colonialism and postcolonialism revisited and reinscribed. Prerequisites: French 3160, 3410, 3430 or equivalent. Course conducted in French.

ONLINE

This 1-credit course is part of our 4-credits-over-2 semesters “passeport culturel” sequence designed to be a flexible, online capstone for our majors and minors, based around events they attend and write about, and then a final capstone project. 

Students enroll in the 1-credit “events” course in the Fall (coordinated here by a grad student) and then with French faculty for the 3 credit capstone in the Spring (Prof. Daniel Sipe, Spring 22).  Students will attend a variety of events, in person or online, where they see French in action and get a chance to experience discussions around contemporary French issues and interests, from gastronomy to street art, from film to music.  In the Fall session, students will also have a conversation hour each week to practice French with a native speaker.  The course is asynchronous & online to offer maximum flexibility to those seeking to complete their major and minor in between other coursework.

Megan Moore, W 3:30-6 HYBRID

Beginning with histories of emotion and affect theory, this seminar will consider the place of emotions in political life.  Reading theory ranging from Sara Ahmed’s work on emotions as a political practice; to Judith Butler's question "whose lives are grievable"?;  to medievalists’ use of “emotional communities”; to neurobiological readings of affect as an uncontrollable, pre-cognitive biochemical response, we will investigate how the reception of affect impacts conversations around power and human rights in contemporary film, novels ranging from medieval to modern, short stories, Black Lives Matter, & even in the description of recent events at the US capitol.  What is the role of passion and emotions in constructing and defending citizenship, and to what extent is the regulation of emotions the very basis for society? 

Graduate Instructor, Taught In-Person

German 1100 is an introduction to the German language and German-speaking cultures. The course is designed to provide a foundation in vocabulary and grammar in order to develop basic communicative proficiency in German. You will be trained using the five language skills: listening, speaking, writing, culture and reading. In addition, through video, audio, readings and class discussions, you will be exposed to various aspects of the culture in German-speaking countries. From the beginning of the course, we will use as much German as possible and we encourage students to do the same. By actively participating, you will not only make more rapid progress, you will also have more fun. The semester-long German 1100 course covers Chapters E-6 of Deutsch: Na klar – An Introductory by Robert Di Donato. With successful completion of the course, you will be able to: engage in brief conversations on everyday topics (such as daily routines, family, university life, hobbies, responsibilities, etc.); comprehend simple conversations; read short texts and dialogues; write short compositions on your personal life and environment; identify and evaluate cultural specifics of German-speaking societies; understand and apply foundational grammatical concepts. This is a five-credit course which meets daily.

Graduate Instructor, Taught Online

The online version of the course has the same objectives as the on-campus course, but will be taught exclusively online. During a typical week, the class will Zoom synchronously three days a week and students will work independently and on a flexible schedule two days a week.   German 1100 is an introduction to the German language and German-speaking cultures. The course is designed to provide a foundation in vocabulary and grammar in order to develop basic communicative proficiency in German. You will be trained using the five language skills: listening, speaking, writing, culture and reading. In addition, through video, audio, readings and class discussions, you will be exposed to various aspects of the culture in German-speaking countries. From the beginning of the course, we will use as much German as possible and we encourage students to do the same. By actively participating, you will not only make more rapid progress, you will also have more fun. The semester-long German 1100 course covers Chapters E-6 of Deutsch: Na klar – An Introductory by Robert Di Donato. With successful completion of the course, you will be able to: engage in brief conversations on everyday topics (such as daily routines, family, university life, hobbies, responsibilities, etc.); comprehend simple conversations; read short texts and dialogues; write short compositions on your personal life and environment; identify and evaluate cultural specifics of German-speaking societies; understand and apply foundational grammatical concepts. This is a five-credit course.

Megan McKinstry, Taught In-Person

German 1100 is an introduction to the German language and German-speaking cultures. This particular course is an integrated section of non-honors and honors students who will be subject to different requirements. The course is designed to provide a foundation in vocabulary and grammar in order to develop basic communication proficiency in German. You will be trained using the four language skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. In addition, through video, audio, readings and class discussion, you will be exposed to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. From the beginning of the course, we will try to use as much German as possible and encourage students to do the same. By actively participating you will quickly see results, and will have more fun. With successful completion of the course, you will be able to: engage in brief conversations on everyday topics (such as daily routines, family, university life, hobbies, responsibilities, etc.); comprehend simple conversations; read short texts and dialogues; write short compositions on your personal life and environment; identify and evaluate cultural specifics of German-speaking societies; understand and apply foundational grammatical concepts. This is a five-credit course which meets three days a week.

The semester-long German 1100 course covers content through Chapter 6 of Deutsch: Na klar – An Introductory German Course by Robert Di Donato and the accompanying online workbook. 

Graduate Instructor, Taught In-Person

This course is the second of two introductory German language courses at MU and continues the linguistic and cultural introduction provided by German 1100. The main focus of this course is on the further development of basic communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in German. Additionally, more nuanced cultural and sociolinguistic competencies will be explored. With the successful completion of the course, students will be able to: engage in extended, slightly more complex conversations on everyday topics (including health, professional goals, past experiences, travel and weather); comprehend simple conversations at normal speech temp; comprehend short informational and literary texts; write with increasing competence at the paragraph-level about their own lives and the lives and cultures of people residing in German-speaking countries; demonstrate an awareness of cultural similarities and differences between the German-speaking countries and the US as they pertain to the the topics covered; understand and utilize basic grammatical concepts including the perfect, the simple past and relative clauses. The five-credit course meets daily and covers content from chapters 7 to 11 of Deutsch: Na klar – An Introductory German Course by Robert Di Donato and the accompanying online workbook, Connect

Graduate Instructor, Online

The online version of the course has the same objectives as the on-campus course, but will be taught exclusively online. During a typical week, the class will Zoom synchronously three days a week and students will work independently and on a flexible schedule two days a week.   This course is the second of two introductory German language courses at MU and continues the linguistic and cultural introduction provided by German 1100. The main focus of this course is on the further development of basic communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in German. Additionally, more nuanced cultural and sociolinguistic competencies will be explored. With the successful completion of the course, students will be able to: engage in extended, slightly more complex conversations on everyday topics (including health, professional goals, past experiences, travel and weather); comprehend simple conversations at normal speech temp; comprehend short informational and literary texts; write with increasing competence at the paragraph-level about their own lives and the lives and cultures of people residing in German-speaking countries; demonstrate an awareness of cultural similarities and differences between the German-speaking countries and the US as they pertain to the the topics covered; understand and utilize basic grammatical concepts including the perfect, the simple past and relative clauses. The five-credit course meets daily and covers content from chapters 7 to 11 of Deutsch: Na klar – An Introductory German Course by Robert Di Donato and the accompanying online workbook, Connect

Graduate Instructor, Online

German 2100 provides the last phase of an introduction to the German language and the cultures of those who speak it, with primary emphasis on providing the skills and knowledge necessary to advance to intermediate-level language usage at a quicker pace than in previous courses. The focus is on further development of basic communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in German. Additionally, more nuanced cultural and sociolinguistic competencies will be explored through a range of materials, including a television show and several film screenings. 

Dr. Seth Howes 

Taught in-person, this participation- and collaboration-focused course will empower students to further develop their everyday vocabulary, oral and written communication skills in German. Music, art, and literature from contemporary Germany and Austria will be incorporated into lessons, as well.

Megan McKinstry

This on-campus, 3-credit, highly interactive course builds on skills developed in 2100. Students will brush up on essential structures, and expand their active vocabulary and cultural knowledge while speaking, reading, writing, viewing, acting, and listening to/in German. Themes covered include: Self-definition, personal goals, fairy tales, and travel. Students will view a German road trip movie entirely without subtitles--and will understand it! At the end of the semester, students will design and present their own fairy tales.

Sean Ireton, Mo/We 11:00-11:50; Fr 11:00-11:50 or 12:00-12:50

(3 credits)

Lecture course with Friday breakout sessions (either WI or non-WI) on the development of German civilization from the ancient Germanic migrations to the early nineteenth-century Napoleonic invasions. This course combines history, mythology, philosophy, art, architecture, and literature in pursuit of the complex question of German cultural and national identity. Some of the important figures, phenomena, and events covered include the conflict between Germania and the Roman Empire, the Age of Chivalry, the medieval epic The Song of the Nibelungen, Gothic and Baroque architecture, Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Enlightenment, the rise of Prussia, Goethe’s Faust tragedy, Romantic painting and poetry. Conducted in English and assumes no knowledge of German.

Megan McKinstry

In this on-campus, 3-credit, highly-interactive class, we will immerse ourselves in German, using stories, conversations, songs, movies, debates, and--of course, grammar tasks. The goal is to gain clarity about our own perspective, to engage with the opinions of our classmates, and to articulate them with increasing eloquence in German, using discourse markers. Of course, we will also strive to improve our grammatical accuracy along the way and to learn as much about Germany as possible. Topics include a unit on psychology (“Don’t believe everything you think”), discrimination, and the “perfect world”. Activities include staging a gameshow, creating a film adaptation of a short-story and a classwide debate on a topic of your choosing.

Sean Franzel

Taught in person in German, this course aims at improving reading competence in German while developing an intellectual framework to support future studies in the German language, literature, and culture.

Monika Fischer

Taught online/hybrid in English, no German language skills required. Writing Intensive - Honors section - A&S Diversity 

This inter-departmental course focuses on dynamics of globalization and its impact on cultures around the world from various interdisciplinary perspectives.  Lectures and discussion sessions will address and evaluate the roles of social, entrepreneurial, non-profit and for-profit organizations and their use of transformational technologies in a global setting as well as introduce students to fundamental problems and concepts of today’s global society. Emphasis is placed upon cultural diversity, life in an interconnected and precarious world, and the analysis of new media environments.

A primary concern of the course will be the examination of the contradictions and paradoxes of globalization, which, on the one hand, generates economic and geographical processes with significant social consequences due to rapid growth, population movements, political change, and creation of a vast gap between global wealth and poverty.  Yet, on the other hand, globalization can present new opportunities for groups and individuals (mostly in developing countries) who have struggled historically to find a viable place in the world economy.

Kristin Kopp & Martha Kelly, Tue/Thurs 11-12.15

After the US, Germany and Russia have the world’s largest migrant populations. This introduction to refugee and migration studies takes both geographic centers as lenses through which to view key concepts, categories and questions relating to why groups of people move from one region or locality to another. The course is organized by types of migration—voluntary and involuntary—even as it problematizes this distinction and many others. In particular, we will investigate how migration relates to nation-building and national identity. Topics cover movements in (what are now) Germany and Russia from about 300 CE to the present day. Students will work not only with historiographical and scholarly texts, but also with novels, memoirs, paintings and film to explore the work that cultural representations of migration do.

Kristin Kopp

AKA: The Grammar Hammer. Taught in person in German. You never knew German grammar could be this fun! This course is designed to take your language level up a solid notch, regardless of your current strengths and weaknesses. Open to students who have successfully completed German 3160 (or equivalent). Not open to native speakers of German without prior consultation with instructor.

Sean Ireton, Tu/Th 2:00-3:15

(3 credits)

Literature course on the “uncanny” (e.g. ghost stories, grotesque fiction, supernatural tales, doppelganger narratives) in German poetry and prose from the late eighteenth to early twentieth century. Includes texts by famous German authors such as Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Ludwig Tieck, E.T.A. Hoffmann, the Brothers Grimm, and Franz Kafka. Conducted in German.

Taught online/hybrid in English, no German language skills required. Satisfies A&S Diversity Requirement.

This course examines the ways in which people across the globe are affected every day by an unprecedented array of linkages that defy geographic and political boundaries. As our point of reference, we will concentrate on three case studies. The first is an analysis of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular SDG Goal One that addresses ending extreme poverty. We will analyze the goals, look at how and where they are implemented and analyze their future impact with the spotlight on Africa and its relations with former colonial powers.

The second case study looks at strategic visions and shifting alliances in the Middle East and how history and global relations have reshaped that region in the 20th and 21st century. We will analyze the mixed reputation of geopolitics and compare current geopolitical developments in Iran and Turkey to Kinzer’s “grand strategy” for the Middle East.

The third case study analyzes the presence of Islam in Europe and how it plays out in politics and culture in particular in regards to Europe’s border crisis and the new changing configurations of migration from Africa. Another focus is on gender issues in Northern-African Islamic societies, which is becoming a prominent socio-political issue in European politics due to the influx of Muslim immigrants. 

Lisa Bragg, Sec 01  MoTuWeThFri 10:00-10:50am in person  – Lab: online asynchronous (6 credits)
Sec 02  MoTuWeThFri. 11:00-11:50am in person – Lab: online asynchronous (6 credits)

In this course you’ll develop basic language skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of the Italian language. ITAL1100 is the first part of a two-semester intensive approach to language learning, which will allow you to fulfill your language requirement in two semesters. Throughout the semester students will develop oral/aural and written language proficiency in Italian while also learning various aspects of Italian culture and society. The 5-hour option is open ONLY to Bachelor of Music students.

Roberta Tabanelli, Tue/Thu 2:00-3:15pm (taught in person)

(3 credits)

This course continues the development of the four-language skills you have acquired in Elementary Italian I and II. With the help of a wide array of authentic material, such as film, music, newspapers articles, commercials, and the Internet, we will focus on comprehension of oral and written texts, acquisition of new vocabulary, and development of reading and writing strategies. We will selectively review fundamental grammar points and will add new, more complex grammatical structures that will help you in conversing, reading, and composing short works. By the end of the course, with reasonable effort, students will be able to understand (through reading and listening) and communicate (in writing and orally) with a certain fluency and self-confidence in both formal and informal situations. 

Roberta Tabanelli, Tue/Thu 11:00am-12:15pm (taught in person) - LAB (screenings): online

This course offers a historical overview of Italian cinema from the origins to the present. It will introduce students to the masterpieces of Italian cinema, with examples from the silent era, Neorealism, art films, and genres such as spaghetti western and horror films, and will provide the analytical skills necessary to read and critically analyze films. Socio-historical issues will be raised and examined for each film as appropriate. No knowledge of Italian is necessary. All films are subtitled or dubbed in English. The weekly screenings are required and mandatory. Students should watch the films on their own prior to the class discussion.

For beginners with no prior knowledge of Japanese. Three hours of lecture instruction and three hours of practice/drill per week in small groups.

Credit Hours: 6


 

Develops oral and written command of Japanese as well as listening comprehension and further essay writing skills.

 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: C- or better in JAPNSE 1200, or equivalent


 

Develops reading and speaking skills and acquisition of more Kanji, vocabulary, and complex structures.

 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: C- or better in JAPNSE 3160, or equivalent, or instructor's consent


 

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. Suitable for students who have taken JAPNSE 3370 or equivalent.

 

Credit Hour: 1-3

Prerequisites: Instructor's consent, sophomore standing


 

Eunyoung Choi, Mon/Tue/Thur/Fri, 9:00-10:30 am.

(6 credits)

Elementary Korean I is designed for those who do not have any previous knowledge of the Korean language. This course will allow students to learn the Korean language by learning the Korean alphabet, basic vocabulary, and fundamental grammar rules through simple exercises, compositions, and readings. Students will also be exposed to Korean culture through Korean songs, movies, and basic reading materials. 

 

Eunyoung Choi, Tue/Thur, 11:00 am-12:30 pm

(3 credits)

Intermediate Korean Language I continues to expand the Korean ability that students acquired in the Elementary Korean language series. This course focuses more on developing students’ speaking and writing skills to use in their daily lives. Besides learning textbook material, students will be exposed to a variety of authentic materials, including K-pop, K-novels, K-dramas, and also K-food to understand the use of the Korean language in a social and cultural context. 

Je-Kook Chung, Mon/Wed, 3:30-4:45 pm.  

(3 credits)

The Korean Economy has developed with amazing speed since the Korean War in 1950.

Students will be introduced to Korea’s top enterprises, learn about these business’ history, and their role in the Korean economy. It will also explore the Korean entertainment industry-- how it impacts the Korean economy as a whole and how it expands into other industries. A variety of illustrations (music, drama/movie clips, commercial ads, magazine articles, etc.) will be used for students to explore the characteristics of the K-entertainment industry.

Students will not only learn about the Korean economy, but also be exposed to related social issues in Korean society. 

Wangsik Kim, Mon/Wed, 2:00-3:15 p.m.

(3 credits)

This course is designed to help student understand the dynamics of Korean politics by critically examining major political issues in Korean political history since 1945.  Korea is the only country that has still remained in the Cold War international structure. Since the division of Korean peninsula, the two Koreas are competing each other for the legitimacy among Koreans.  For critical understanding of the Korean politics, I will first deal with the ethnicity, geography, political culture and short Korean history as background of the Korean politics.  Then I will discuss the division of Korean peninsula and emergence of two Koreas, Korean war and the political implication of the two Koreas.  And then I will focus on the economy, politics and defense issues of South and North Korea.  I am also planning to dea with several issues that might have affected the South-North Korean politics, that is. ROK-US Alliance, North Korean nuclear challenge and unification questions. 

Jack Draper, TR 12:30-1:45 pm

(3 credits)

This course explores Latin American societies, cultures, and questions of national and regional identity as expressed through literary, historical and journalistic writings on soccer, as well as through fictional and documentary films on this global sport with strong roots in Latin American popular culture. In lectures, class discussions and written assignments, we will explore questions such as: To what degree has soccer influenced artistic endeavors in Latin American countries, how has it been involved in nation formation, and can we speak of a Latin American regional identity expressed through soccer and artistic or philosophical/cultural representations of the sport? How does the sport help to mediate Latin American societies’ sense of cultural regionalism or nationalism, and their view of their own place in the world, collectively or as individual nations? How does it influence and/or reflect understandings of class, race, gender and sexuality in Latin American cultures as represented in literature, film and broader public discourse?

Jack Draper, TR 11:00 am -12:15 pm [lecture],
W 7:00 pm -9:30 pm [film screenings]

(3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to some of the major themes and styles of Brazilian cinema since the 1950s (with some general overview of the pre-1950s era). Students will view approximately 14 films ranging in period from pre-Cinema Novo to contemporary works. Films will be primarily feature-length fiction, but will also include documentaries. The instructor will offer analyses of the films within the larger context of the national and regional cultures of Brazil. The major themes that will be addressed at length in lecture, class discussion and student papers are: marginality, crime and social class; sexuality, gender, and race; and internal migration, regionalism, and nationalism.

MTWThF 11-11:50 in person, plus one hour online asynchronous.

(6 credits) 

For beginners with no prior knowledge of Russian. We will introduce you to this fascinating language and the cultures that use it.

MTWTh 10-10:50 in person.

(4 credits) 

Prerequisite: Russ 1200 or instructor’s consent. Students will solidify their command of Russian grammar and begin developing their reading skills.

Hybrid format: lectures online, discussion sections Friday 12-12:50 and 1-1:50.

In this course we will survey Russian culture and history from the pre-Christian era to the present. No knowledge of Russian required.

Martha Kelly. TTh 2-3.15 

(3 credits)

A proficiency-focused approach to help students move from an intermediate toward an advanced level of language across multiple modes (speaking, reading, listening, writing). As we explore the diverse cultures of the Russian-speaking world, students will have opportunities for directed research into topics of their choice, as well as for developing skills in interviewing in the target language.

Mondays and Wednesdays 2:00-3:15, in person.

(3 credits)

We will read some major works of prose fiction from a time when Russia experienced a series of drastic changes in society and culture. As often happens, writers and artists responded more rapidly and insightfully than anyone else. This was a time of radical experimentation with the very nature of literature, and we will examine and discuss some of the fascinating results. No knowledge of Russian required.

Martha Kelly & Kristin Kopp. TTh 11-12.15 

(3 credits)

After the US, Germany and Russia have the world’s largest migrant populations. This introduction to refugee and migration studies takes both geographic centers as lenses through which to view key concepts, categories and questions relating to why groups of people move from one region or locality to another. The course is organized by types of migration—voluntary and involuntary—even as it problematizes this distinction and many others. In particular, we will investigate how migration relates to nation-building and national identity. Topics cover movements in (what are now) Germany and Russia from about 300 CE to the present day. Students will work not only with historiographical and scholarly texts, but also with novels, memoirs, paintings and film to explore the work that cultural representations of migration do.

Noah Myers, Coordinator.  Multiple time slots available.  In person and online options.

This course offers a second-semester introduction to the Spanish language and the many cultures it encompasses.  It is designed for students who have taken Spanish 1100 or who have more than two years of previous experience studying Spanish.  Students will develop their skills in the areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening while learning advanced grammatical structures and vocabulary through topics such as daily routine, food, relationships, health, technology and the household. 

 

Carlos Mendez, Coordinator.  Multiple time slots available. M-Th. Hybrid 

This course, designed for students who have taken Spanish 1200 or an equivalent course. It offers further introduction to the Spanish language and the many cultures it encompasses. Your course work will allow you to develop all four language skills: reading, speaking, listening and writing along with the cultural background necessary to help you to communicate effectively in Spanish. In order to expose you to as much Spanish as possible and to develop your listening and speaking skills, this class is conducted in Spanish. You will see that your ability to understand and to respond will develop quite rapidly. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand authentic dialogues and texts, engage in conversations on everyday topics and write compositions. Learning a new language can be very rewarding. We all hope that your experience will be positive and productive.

Carlos Mendez, M-Th 11:00-11:50.  Hybrid. 

This honors course is designed for students who have taken Spanish 1200 or an equivalent course. The course seeks to improve students’ fluency in Spanish and to expose them to the many cultures it encompasses. Your course work will allow you to develop all four language skills: reading, speaking, listening and writing along with the   cultural background necessary to help you to communicate effectively in Spanish. In order to expose you to as much Spanish as possible and to develop your listening and speaking skills, this class is conducted in Spanish. You will see that your ability to understand and to respond will develop quite rapidly. This course may integrate cultural events outside the classroom as well such as movies, guest lectures, art exhibits, seminars or concerts as available. Once a semester, the students may also meet with Honors Spanish 1100 and 1200 students as a cohort group for further intellectual exchange and enrichment. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand communicative acts and read texts from primary Spanish sources, engage in conversations on a variety of topics, and write       compositions about your thoughts and opinions on matters studied in class. Learning a new language can be very rewarding. I all hope that your experience will be positive and productive.

Noah Myers, Tue/Thurs 11:00-12:15pm (in person)

This course provides a broad survey of the history, culture and current events of modern Latin American. Topics include indigenous cultures before and since the Spanish conquest, the struggle for independence, the contributions of Afro-Latin Americans, revolutions and social movements in the 20th and 21st centuries, relations with the US, emigration, the War on Drugs, the effects of the pandemic and so much more.

We will start with the Caribbean and proceed from Mexico to Central and then South America. For each country featured, we will cover flashpoints in history, along with contemporary issues key to understanding the country today. In addition, we’ll learn about the greatest musical, artistic and literary figures of the continent. Class materials will include book excerpts, news articles, music videos, documentary and feature film clips and guest lectures from other MU Spanish faculty.

Open to any student interested. No knowledge of Spanish required. Counts toward general humanities requirement. May not be included in area of concentration in Spanish.

Asier Alcázar, Tue/ Thur 12:30-1:45pm, online only (also asynchronously)

This class improves oral production in Spanish by providing opportunities to engage into conversation, learning new vocabulary and expressions, reviewing challenging grammatical concepts and, above all, by receiving extensive feedback on oral production. It is not possible to speak a foreign language efficiently without awareness of differences in the articulation of sounds. To this end, we dedicate two lectures to a comparison of Spanish and English Phonetics and Phonology. Feedback on oral production will be based on awareness of this new knowledge. 

Students will create a PowerPoint presentation in groups (15~25 minutes) to introduce a topic on the news in Spain in recent years and direct a group discussion. The new vocabulary and expressions in these presentations will be included in the tests. Because this class features a secondary emphasis on improving grammar/written competence, students will write six compositions. The language of instruction is Spanish. Students must use it exclusively in their interaction with the professor (in class, Zoom office visits) and among themselves. Notes will be PowerPoint based and they will be available in Canvas. Lectures will be recorded in Zoom and made available in Canvas for students who need to take the course asynchronously.

Erick Blandon, Mon/Wed 11:00-12:15 or 2:00- 3:15 

his course is an introduction to the study of the Hispanic Literatures. It focuses on literary genres such as short stories, essays, and cinematic adaptations of literary works written in Spanish. The objective of this course is to examine a series of literary pieces and films by Spaniard and Spanish-American authors. Emphasis will be placed upon pro-active student participation and class debate. Thus, the course has been designed as an opportunity for students who are interested in further developing Spanish proficiency skills through discussions, specialized literature, and audiovisual resources. Additionally, students will become familiar with basic concepts of literary/film criticism and will be expected to apply them while working on their assignments.

In order to be successful in this course, it is recommended that students have previously taken SPAN 3150 and SPAN 3160.

Dawn Heston, T/Th 11:-12:15 In person

This course is for students who are interested in the teaching of foreign languages. It is intended to provide a foundation in the various ways to teach foreign languages, current second language acquisition research as it relates to teaching, and relevant lesson planning and implementation. Students in this course will be expected to interpret, analyze and integrate the information into their work.

The discussions and materials presented throughout the course foster understanding of the theoretical background of second language acquisition, the current methodologies in foreign language teaching with an emphasis on the communicative and interactive approach and the availability of resources (journals, organizations, publishing houses) within the foreign language teaching profession. Students in the course will also explore the practical applications of these methodologies in the classroom through the development of techniques, strategies, and activities to achieve communication and enhance student motivation. With these communicative and interactive objectives in mind, students will create assessment procedures, evaluate and select teaching materials, design supplementary materials and explore the use of technology in the classroom.

Asier Alcázar, Tue/Thurs 9:30-10:45am, online only (also asynchronously)

This course is an introduction to linguistics as a cognitive science focusing on Spanish and English. Topics include language acquisition, bilingualism, language disorders, writing systems, prescriptivism (linguistic discrimination), phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, and linguistic interference from English in pronunciation, sentence structure and verb structure. The language of instruction is Spanish. Students must use it exclusively in their interaction with the professor (in class, Zoom office visits) and among themselves.  Class modality is online only. Zoom lectures will be recorded and made available for those students who need to take the course asynchronously. Notes will be PowerPoint based and they will be available in Canvas.

Dr. J. Cordones-CookTuesdays and Thursdays (in person) (3 credits)

This course will provide a panoramic view of Afro  Latin American theater, including Brazilian drama in translation. Through outstanding dramatic works we will examine vital cultural, social, literary, religious,  ritualistic, and historical aspects of the African Diaspora experience and world in Latin America.  These plays give testimony of the overwhelming cultural presence of African legacies in the “New World”. 

This is not an acting class but group readings of plays will be expected, in addition to presentations and writing.

Dr. Mar SoriaTu/Th 12:30PM - 1:45PM, ARTS & SCIENCE BLDG 103

From the lens of postcolonial and feminist theory, in this course we will work with literary texts, films, and other cultural artifacts to understand how alterity is defined and resisted in contemporary Spain. We will pay special attention to the role of alterity in nation-building and national identity. Some topics to be discussed in this class range from debates on slavery in 19th-century Spain, misogyny and classism in Franco’s fascist dictatorship, to current immigration issues.